A mis-interpretation of the matriliny of Samuel Paynter, (1768 – 1845)

Hazzard-222   Meritta (Hazzard) Paynter (abt. 1748 - aft. 1814)Paynter-415     Samuel Paynter Sr.  (abt. 1736 - bef. 1815)Paynter-166     Samuel Paynter (1768 - 1845) [1] While wikitree contributors to the profile for Samuel Paynter, Governor of Delaware, between 1824-1827, and the profiles for his parents, Samuel Paynter Sr. and Meritta Hazzard, cite extant records as their sources, … Continue reading A mis-interpretation of the matriliny of Samuel Paynter, (1768 – 1845)

“miles distant from the town of Lewis as the road goes round Dingees Grove or “Touch Me Not” and at the request of Captain Dingee who intermarried with the heir of the afsd James Fisher decd and by virtue of the afsd recited warrant I have surveyed and laid out the above said located marsh and hammock whose bounds and courses are as followeth.

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The paradox of Daniel Dingee’s political ideology

Daniel Dingee, and many of his contemporaries of Sussex county, Kent and New Castle counties, Delaware came from a conservative background and not unlike their antecedents appreciated the principles of English law and liberties. [1] Dan Dingee, as he preferred to acknowledge himself when signing legal documents, fits the Loyalist profile: land owner, conservative farmer, … Continue reading The paradox of Daniel Dingee’s political ideology

Problems with “Stories for a Sunday Afternoon”

In his monograph, “Stories for a Sunday Afternoon”, Maynard H Mires presents an unconvincing case his “revolutionary” ancestor Daniel Myers (Miers, Mires), Indian slayer and original settler of the Minisink township, descends from Delaware Quaker families, Miers and Cummings. Mires is correct in stating Ann Cummings daughter of Enoch Cumming married John Miers between 1747-48 … Continue reading Problems with “Stories for a Sunday Afternoon”

Obadiah Eldridge, Phila. 1740-1755; Is he the son of Joseph Eldridge, Kent county 28 1749 Fifth (28 Jul 1749)?

Phila. MM Minutes 1740-1755 (image 102) 28 1749 Fifth (28 Jul 1749) The Meeting being informed that Obadiah Eldridge is lately broke much in debt and as he says unable to make any reasonable composition with his creditors, and as it appears that he was a considerable time since advised to deliver up his effects … Continue reading Obadiah Eldridge, Phila. 1740-1755; Is he the son of Joseph Eldridge, Kent county 28 1749 Fifth (28 Jul 1749)?

Trespass 1702, Sussex Delaware, Thomas Fisher v. Samuel Rowland

Who are the many Samuel Rowland's of Sussex county, Delaware, British Colonial America ? Deeds, book A1-B2, 1693-1698 (folio 100-102) ? Thomas Fisher Plt. agt Samuel Rowland Deft; In a plea of trespass upon the case And therein the said Plt. complains that on the 18th day of November last past, being the fourth year … Continue reading Trespass 1702, Sussex Delaware, Thomas Fisher v. Samuel Rowland

Wedding bells ring in Wroxham

Worshippers of the medieval church, St Mary’s, standing on a lofty eminence above the River Bure, Wroxham could be forgiven their confusion during the month of October 1843 when marriage banns were read for three members of the same family on three consecutive Sundays with two sets of the betrothed couples named William and Maria.  … Continue reading Wedding bells ring in Wroxham

“Oh, thou demon Drink, thou fell destroyer”

Catharine McPhail, the first wife of fisherman, Duncan McTavish, died before civil registration of Scottish births deaths and marriage commenced in 1855.  The only clue to her ancestry was thirty-year old mariner, James McPhail, enumerated as brother-in-law with the McTavish family in the 1851 census.[1]  But, James' occupation was a fabrication and for years the … Continue reading “Oh, thou demon Drink, thou fell destroyer”